Archive for the 'Bibliographies' Category



Only The Flat Hat Cares About This

Chiglinsky, Katherine. “What’s the Future of the Three-Person Rule?” The Flat Hat (Williamsburg, VA), November 12, 2012, News. Accessed February 6, 2014. http://flathatnews.com/2012/11/12/williamsburg-three-person-rule-rental-housing/.

The Flat Hat (Williamsburg, VA). “3-Person Rule to Stay in City’s Proposal.” October 16, 2009, Uncategorized. Accessed February 6, 2014.  http://flathatnews.com/2009/10/16/71790/.

The Flat Hat (Williamsburg, VA). “4-Person Rule in B-3 District.” November 20, 2009, Uncategorized. Accessed February 6, 2014. http://flathatnews.com/2009/ 11/20/72211/.

The Flat Hat (Williamsburg, VA). “Commission Decides Against 4-Person Proposal.” September 25, 2009, Uncategorized. Accessed February 6, 2014.  http://flathatnews.com/2009/09/25/71590/.

The Flat Hat (Williamsburg, VA). “Staff Editorial: Outrageous Rental Plan.” January 22, 2008, Editorial. Accessed February 6, 2014.  http://flathatnews.com/2008/01/22/ staff-editorial-outrageous-rental-plan/.

The Flat Hat Editorial Board. “A Balanced Solution: The Future of the Three-Person Rule.” The Flat Hat (Williamsburg, VA), November 12, 2012, Editorial. Accessed February 6, 2014. http://flathatnews.com/2012/11/12/thee-person-rule-williamsburg-housing/.

———. “Cooperation Is Key: City Council’s 2013 Comprehensive Plan Will Benefit Both The College And The City.” The Flat Hat (Williamsburg, VA), January 21, 2013, Opinions. Accessed February 6, 2014. http://flathatnews.com/2013/01/21/ williamsburg-city-council-comprehensive-plan-housing/.

———. “End Antiquated Rule.” The Flat Hat (Williamsburg, VA), April 12, 2013, Editorial. Accessed February 6, 2014. http://flathatnews.com/2013/04/12/ williamsburg-city-council-three-person-rule/.

The Flat Hat Staff. “Staff Editorial: Housing Hypocrisy in the City of Williamsburg.” The Flat Hat (Williamsburg, VA), February 20, 2007, Editorial. Accessed February 6, 2014. http://flathatnews.com/2007/02/20/staff-editorial-housing-hypocrisy-city-williamsburg/.

Kennedy, Amber Lester. “Citizens Turn Out to Push Approval of City Comp Plan.” WY Daily. Last modified January 11, 2013. Accessed February 6, 2014.  http://wydaily.com/2013/01/11/citizens-turn-out-to-push-approval-of-city-comp-plan/.

Needham, James. “Proposed City Law Lets B&B Owners Hire Live-In Managers.” WY Daily. Last modified November 21, 2013. Accessed February 6, 2014. http://wydaily.com/2013/11/21/proposed-city-law-lets-bb-owners-hire-live-in-managers/.

WY Daily Staff. “Planning Comm. Doesn’t Like 4-Person Rule.” WY Daily. Last modified September 23, 2009. Accessed February 6, 2014. http://wydailyarchives.com/local-news/2746-planning-comm-doesnt-like-4-person-rule.html.

 

Preliminary Bibliography

1. “Encyclopedia of Southern Jewish Communities: Williamsburg, Virginia.” The Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life. N.p., n.d. Web. <http://isjl.org/history/archive/va/williamsburg.htm>.

2. Ginsberg, Louis. Chapters On the Jews of Virginia, 1658-1900. Petersburg, Va.: Cavalier Press, 1969.

3. Urofsky, Melvin I., Virginia Historical Society, and Jewish Community Federation of Richmond.Commonwealth and Community: The Jewish Experience in Virginia. Richmond, Va.: Virginia Historical Society and Jewish Community Federation of Richmond, 1997.

4. Rowe, Linda H. Brief Information About Jews in Early America and Williamsburg.

5. Ivers, Gregg. To Build a Wall: American Jews and the Separation of Church and State. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1995.

6. Kaganoff, Nathan M., Melvin I Urofsky, and American Jewish Historical Society. “Turn to the South”: Essays On Southern Jewry. Charlottesville: Published for the American Jewish Historical Society by the University Press of Virginia, 1979.

7. Richmond Jewish Community Council., and Marilyn Greenberg. Through the Years: A Study of the Richmond Jewish Community. [Richmond, Va, 1955.

8. Ely, Carol., et al. To Seek the Peace of the City: Jewish Life in Charlottesville, an Exhibition Catalog. Charlottesville, Va.: Hillel Jewish Center at the University of Virginia with Congregation Beth Israel, 1994.

9. Valentine Museum., and Jewish Community Federation of Richmond. Free to Profess: The First Century of Richmond Jewry, 1786-1886. Richmond, Va,: The Museum, 1986.

10. Student Organizations Collection, Special Collections Research Center, Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary. Box 18: Religious Organizations: Inter-Y.

McLane Updated Bibliography

WEBSITES

“Big Brothers Big Sisters.”, accessed March 10, 2013, http://www.bbbs.org/site/c.9iILI3NGKhK6F/b.5962335/k.BE16/Home.htm.

The national BBBS website is very similar to the BBBS of the Greater VA Peninsula website. However, I hope to explore it more to find out about the national and international impact that BBBS makes. One interesting part of the website that I stumbled upon was the Newsroom section; it has all the latest press releases and articles about BBBS.  I also hope to be able to find interesting news stories about the influence of BBBS nationally.  So far, I have dug through a lot of articles from local papers all around the country.  I am trying to find something more broad and suitable for explaining major goals and successes of the organization at large.

 

“Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Virginia Peninsula.”, accessed February 10, 2013, http://www.bbbsgw.org/site/c.duLUK7OPLnK8E/b.8387877/k.F0B9/Home_Page.htm.

The Big Brothers Big Sisters website is very detailed and full of information. I have not spent enough time looking through each tab of information.  This will be my next step in gathering preliminary information about the organization before I conduct interviews.  I hope to be able to gain more information about the founding of this local chapter as well as newspaper articles covering its opening.

 

“Community Facts: Williamsburg City, Virginia.” United States Census Bureau: American FactFinder., accessed February 10, 2013,http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_facts.xhtml.

This section of the US Census Bureau website allows users to search for any state, city, town, county, or zip code and view details about its population, age distribution, education, housing, income levels, language, poverty level and number of veterans.  This is extremely useful because it provides much the basic information that I need for the background research of my project in one place.  While I can find more detailed numbers and breakdowns in other places on the website, the FactFinder provides a comprehensive view.

 

Persaud, Chris. “A Map of Income and Rent in Every Neighborhood in America.” Rich Blocks Poor Blocks., http://www.richblockspoorblocks.com/.

This website shows a visual representation of information from the 2007-2011 American Community Survey.  Users can target any city or neighborhood and see its income rate and rent average. A color gradient from red to green shows the highest, lowest, and mid ranges of the spectrum.  You can literally look at a single neighborhood anywhere in the country. This could be a great tool to use if it turns out many of the bigs or littles are from a certain neighborhood in the Williamsburg area.

 

“Williamsburg (City), Virginia QuickFacts.” United States Census Bureau., last modified January 10, 2013, accessed February 10, 2013, http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/index.html.

This section of the US Census Bureau website allows users to search for states or cities and provides general demographic information about those places.  I can use this to gather information about Williamsburg in comparison to other places in Virginia or the country.  I would like to explore the Census website a little more thoroughly because I do not think that I fully understand how to use all of the tools at this point.  However, I think that this source will be very important for my research about things such as poverty level and unemployment rate in Williamsburg.

 

 

ARTICLES

Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Virginia Peninsula. 2012. 2011-12 Annual Report.

This short document describes the mission of Big Brother Big Sister along with details about the organization’s programs, fundraisers and events.  This provides additional information to accompany the website. In addition, the report includes revenue as well as amount spent for the year.  This transparency is helpful for members of the community and especially for my research purposes.

 

Langley, Cortney. 2013. “Groups Scramble to House Displaced Family Inn Tenants.” Virginia Gazette. http://www.vagazette.com/news/va-vg-james-city-agencies-scrambling-to-place-family-inn-tenants-20130225,0,5782661.story

This article was referenced in one of the comments below an article about the same topic in the Williamsburg Yorktown Daily.  It is interesting to read the same story in two different newspapers.  This article also provides an interesting take on poverty and poor living conditions in Williamsburg.  It will be important to keep this in mind when writing my paper and continuing research.

 

Parker, Desiree. 2013. “Big Brothers Big Sisters has New Chief Executive Officer.” Williamsburg Yorktown Daily: April 5, 2012. http://wydailyarchives.com/local-news/8758-big-brothers-big-sisters-has-new-executive-director.html.

This article discusses the election of a new Chief Executive Officer of the BBBS Greater VA peninsula. This article is interesting because Miss King, the new director, lists weaknesses, strengths, and goals she recognizes for the organization.  It would be interesting, now almost a year later, to see if she has met any of these goals or implemented any changes.  One article did mention that an event raised a record amount of money this year.  Fundraising was one of her main concerns in this article.

 

Parker, Desiree. 2013. “Hometown Big Brothers Big Sisters Bowling Event Brings in $45K.” Williamsburg Yorktown Daily: March 10, 2013. http://wydaily.com/2013/03/09/hometown-big-brothers-big-sisters-bowling-event-brings-in-45k.

I read this article online at the WY daily website.  It details the success of the local chapter of BBBS in raising money through bowling.  It is inspiring how successful the event was and how excited the community was to help. I would be interested to speak to someone involved in the event to find out more.

 

Pease, Emily. (“Facing Up to Race: Williamsburg Group Seeks to Bridge Rift Between Blacks, Whites.” Virginia-Pilot. 23 July 1996), E3

McCann and Sayle cited this article in their paper, but I have yet to locate it.  I must try to look a little bit harder now that I have a better idea about what I will need to research.  The title makes this article seem very relevant to the background history of my paper.

 

Voll, Brittany. 2013. “JCC Officials Consider Condemnation for Family Inn.” Williamsburg Yorktown Daily: February 27, 2013. http://wydaily.com/2013/02/26/jcc-officials-consider-condemnation-for-family-inn/.

This article details the potential condemnation of the Family Inn in Williamsburg.  Families who live in this hotel risk losing their home if the hotel is, in fact, condemned.  The article provides interesting information about people who live in unconventional ways in Williamsburg. These people, the marginalized population, are the group of people that I am most interested in studying through this project.  The most interesting part of this article, however, was reading the readers’ comments at the bottom.  I hope to be able to cite some of these as they show the different points of view of people who live in Williamsburg.  I think these opinions are crucial to understanding the state of poverty and marginality in Williamsburg.

 

 

ORAL HISTORIES

King, Ayanna.  Interviewed by Amanda Pearl on Tide Radio, December 2012

I found the link to this interview on the Big Brother Big Sister of the Greater Virginia Peninsula website.  Tide Radio conducts an interview with Ayanna King, the CEO of this chapter of Big Brother Big Sister.  A representative from the Great Wolf Lodge is also interviewed.  Both women talk about the relationship that Big Brother Big Sister has formed with Great Wolf Lodge. Ayanna King also provides some general background information about this chapter of Big Brother Big Sister.  I will listen to this interview again and take notes in greater detail to use for my research.

 

If possible, I would like to conduct interviews with a volunteer Big Brother or Big Sister and his or her Little Brother or Little Sister.  I would also like to get in contact with Rosalyn Mason, the Williamsburg Program Manager at Big Brothers Big Sisters as well as the Williamsburg Program Coordinator, Melissa Buckley.  I have made contact with Miss Mason and will hopefully be able to speak with her in person.

This might be a long shot, but I read in an interview that Mayor Clyde Haulman served on the Big Brothers Big Sisters Board.  I was a student of his a couple of years ago, so I wonder if he would be willing to speak with me about his involvement with Big Brothers Big Sisters.  I will start finding the best way to contact him.

 

 

 

 

 

Updated Annotated Bibliography

All of the sources listed in the initial bibliography remain in this version because my project has largely remained the same.  I have, of course, added new sources.

Brandon, Emily. “10 Bargain Retirement Spots.” U.S. News & World Report, June 11, 2007. http://www.lexisnexis.com/lnacui2api/api/version1/getDocCui?lni=4NWN-SSK0-TX4T-620K&csi=8065&hl=t&hv=t&hnsd=f&hns=t&hgn=t&oc=00240&perma=true (accessed March 10, 2013).

This article is from a reputable publication.  It discusses affordable places for people to retire. Moreover, it mentions college towns as great options of places to retire to since they not only offer many activities and continuing education programs, but they are also affordable since college students live there.  This will be helpful to my research because it has some helpful quotes and information that I can quote in my paper.

 

Brooks, Rodney. “Retirement Living: College towns lure Boomers.” USA Today, Feb 25, 2013. http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/columnist/2013/01/14/retirement-community-saving-home/1817793/ (accessed March 9, 2013).

This article has quotes from real estate agents in college towns as well as pertinent information regarding retirement location, including statistics and figures from AARP.  The article is useful because it not only provides a detailed background story on retirement in college towns but it also contains new information that I did not see in previous searches I did.

 

Bryant, William. Williamsburg Profiles. Williamsburg, VA: William T. Bryant, 1988. Print.

The five volumes contain profiles of local resident published in the early 1980s in the “Williamsburg Advantage.”  I have gone through the first volume and found numerous profiles of Williamsburg residents who attended William and Mary.  Even more exciting is some of these profiles contain explanations of why the various people profiled decided to return to Williamsburg after their William and Mary experiences. Like the other sources I have discussed, these profiles will shed light on what draws alumni back to Williamsburg.  Since these profiles were written nearly 30 years ago, they will give me accounts from some alumni who are probably no longer living. 

 

Interviews with William and Mary alumni who live in Williamsburg

Interviews with alumni who live in Williamsburg will be of great importance to make this research project a success.  Since I want to better understand why some alumni move back to Williamsburg, asking local alumni about their experiences as students at William and Mary may explain what specific aspects of student life influence alumni to permanently return to Williamsburg.  Mr. Barry Trott of the Williamsburg Regional Library has offered to give me the opportunity to interview him since he graduated from William and Mary, and now lives in Williamsburg.  He says he can recommend some others I can interview as well.  Professor Glosson has also told me she knows of some alumni who live in Williamsburg who may be willing to grant me interviews as well.  I will also approach the William and Mary Alumni Association and the local alumni chapter to find more interview subjects.

 

Jansing, Chris. “College towns doubling as retirement communities.” Road to Retirement. NBC Nightly News. Feb 20 2013. Web, http://www.nbcnews.com/video/nightly-news/50880368

This is a story that ran on NBC Nightly News about retirees who decided to relocate to the college town, Oxford, Mississippi.  The retirees discuss their lives among college students and the opportunities available to them in college community.  A professor from Pomona College in southern California discusses his experience teaching retirees.  This story is important to my research because it discusses the same issues I hope to address in my project: what draws retirees to college towns, retiree/alumni involvement in the college community and special opportunities available to retirees.

 

 

Reitzes, Donald C., and Elizabeth J. Mutran. “Lingering Identities in Retirement.” The Sociological Quarterly. 47. no. 2 (2006): 333-359. http://www.jstor.org/stable/4120821 . (accessed March 11, 2013).

This is a scholarly article that examines changes in recent retirees’ identities.  While this does not specifically discuss retirees living in college towns, the article will be helpful to my research since it describes what impact retirement has on an individual.  As a result, I hope I can draw some comparisons between this study and the retired alumni in Williamsburg.  The study does mention how college identities remain with a person for a lifetime (354).  This “college identity” that lingers in a person throughout his or her life may explain why some alumni return to Williamsburg to retire.  I plan to look into more scholarly sources regarding the relationship between identity and place.  

 

Society of the Alumni of the College of William and Mary, William & Mary Alumni Magazine, n.d. n. page. Print.

The Alumni Magazine will be very helpful, not only because it contains interviews with alumni, some of whom live in Williamsburg, but also because it gives me an idea of the various ways the Alumni Association caters to alumni.  So far, I have looked at magazines from the early 2000s and have paid particular attention to the ads for retirement communities within the magazine.  These ads are specifically tailored to William and Mary alumni.  I plan to look more closely at these ads to see what specific aspects of life in Williamsburg the advertisers believe are most important (and influential) to alumni, in order to bring them back to the area.

 

William and Mary Alumni Association. “Alumni Association Report.” April 7, 2007. http://www.wm.edu/about/administration/bov/_documents/reports/2006_2007/04-07-alumni-association-report.pdf (accessed February 5, 2013).

I provided the citation for one of the reports but I will obviously look at multiple reports (they come out twice a year – in September and April). These reports are presented to the BOV and shed light on the Alumni Association’s continued efforts to maintain connections with former William and Mary graduates.  This source will be helpful to my research because it explains the mindset of the Alumni Association by discussing its strategies as well as its findings from research (i.e. demographics).

 

“Williamsburg Landing Tattler News.” Earl Gregg Swem Library Special Collections, 1892-[ongoing], Williamsburg, VA: Print.

Part of the Williamsburg Ephemera Collection in Swem’s Special Collections, the “Williamsburg Landing Tattler News” is a newsletter sent to residents of Williamsburg Landing.  So far, I have paged through newsletters from the late 1980s.  Each newsletter includes profiles of the community’s residents.  Some of these residents graduated from William and Mary and the profiles discuss some of the reasons why the residents moved back.  This will be helpful not only in finding a common theme or reason for why alumni return to live in Williamsburg, but it will also provide accounts from alumni who may no longer be living.  As a result, I will have accounts from an array of alumni who graduated during multiple decades.  Therefore, I can see if a common thread exists between the various generations of alumni who returned to Williamsburg or if reasons for returning differ between generations. I also plan to look into other documents within the Williamsburg Ephemera Collection.  I had little time to go through the files so I was only able to page through the “Williamsburg Landing Tattler News.”

 

Williamsburg’s Next Door Neighbors.  Williamsburg, VA: Collins Group, LLC., 2007-Present. Print.

This monthly publication will be helpful in my research because it provides profiles of Williamsburg residents.  Since quite a few alumni live in Williamsburg, there are bound to be some profiles of alumni.  Special Collections has these magazines and they are also available online (PDF).  Moreover, the publication contains information on local events that can provide information on events that may be attended by William and Mary alumni who live in the area.

Updated Bibliography

I have kept most of the same sources I cited in my last post. Most of them remain relevant to my project, because not a lot has changed. One of the most significant additions to my bibliography is the introduction of the WY Daily newspaper. I hope that this paper, in conjunction with the Virginia Gazette and the Daily Press will provide me with a greater picture of the local attitudes towards the ACA. In order to add a historical prospective to my project, I added Rosemary Stevens’ and Jacobs and Skocpol’s books. Both of them outline past health care reform efforts in the United States both nationally and locally.

 

CNN Wire Staff. (2010). 14 states sue to block health care law. CNN. Retrieved from, http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/03/23/health.care.lawsuit/index.html.

 

This source provides me with the anti-Affordable Care Act (ACA) beliefs of many of the Southern states, including Virginia. It provides me with a state-wide context, which I can compare to Williamsburg’s local attitude towards health care reform.

 

Jacobs, Lawrence R. and Skocpol, Theda. (2012). Health Care Reform and American Politics: What Everyone Needs to Know. New York: Oxford University Press.

 

Dr. Lawrence Jacobs and Dr. Theda Skocpol are prominent professors of political science and sociology, respectively. Their book on health care reform in the United States contains a complete background on the issue. This book, written after the passage of the ACA, outlines its place in the history of health care reform efforts. Although it is written by academics, the book is accessible and easy to navigate.

 

Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF). (2012a). A Guide to the Supreme Court’s Affordable Care Act Decision. KFF: Focus on Health Reform. Retrieved from, http://www.kff.org/healthreform/upload/8332.pdf.

 

The Kaiser Family Foundation’s website is a goldmine of information about health care reform in general and the ACA, specifically. This document in particular is helpful because it discusses the implication of the June 2012 Supreme Court case on the ACA. I predict that when I ask people about their present-day attitudes towards the ACA, many of them will discuss the Supreme Court case. This KFF report will help me understand the context of their remarks as well as confirm or deny any assertions they may have regarding the implications of the Supreme Court decision.

 

KFF. (2012b). A Guide to the Supreme Court’s Decision on the ACA’s Medicaid Expansion. KFF: Focus on Health Reform. Retrieved from, http://www.kff.org/healthreform/upload/8347.pdf.

 

This document is similar to the one referenced above, but it focuses more particularly on Medicaid expansion.

 

(KFF) (2012c). Mapping the Effects of the ACA’s Health Insurance Coverage Expansions. KFF Health Reform Source. Retrieved from, http://healthreform.kff.org/coverage-expansion-map.aspx.

 

This resource provides me with the opportunity to see who will benefit from the ACA. According to the website, upwards of 23% of residents in the 23185 zip code will benefit from ACA coverage expansion. This data is probably not well known so it will be interesting to compare it to the perceived benefits of Williamsburg residents.

Stevens, Rosemary. (2007). The Public-Private Health Care State: Essays on the History of American Health Care Policy. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers.

 

Dr. Rosemary Stevens is a professor of social medicine and public policy at Cornell Medical School. Her book provides readers with historical perspective health care reform efforts in the United States. It is a collection of 17 essays that range in topic from government efforts to expand health care to the private sector’s influence on policy. The crux of the book are Americans’ conflicting beliefs on the role of government in health care – some support expansion, others preach non-involvement, and some are undecided.

 

Washington, W. (2009). Poll: South isn’t buying Obama health plan. The State. Retrieved from, http://www.thestate.com/2009/11/11/1022511/poll-south-isnt-buying-obama-health.html#storylink=misearch.

 

Many of the documents we have read so far refer to Williamsburg as a “Southern town.” I am interested in comparing Williamsburg to the South in general. This South Carolinian newspaper article refers to a poll among Southerners (referenced below) that declares health care reform a less popular political initiative among Southerners. I am interested in seeing if Williamsburg residents agree with their southern counterparts.

 

Winthrop University. (2009). Winthrop Poll of 11 Southern States: Health Care Reform. The Winthrop Poll. Retrieved from, http://www.thestate.com/static/html/winthrop.htm.

 

See above annotation.

 

The White House (2012). Health Insurance Reform Reality Check. Whitehouse.gov. Retrieved from, http://www.whitehouse.gov/realitycheck/faq#i1.

 

This resource provides the federal perspective on health care reform. It comes from the White House so it is obviously pro-health care reform. This should provide me with the facts I use to cross-check with my interviewees’ interpretations of the law.

 

I also plan to use specific articles from the Virginia Gazette, WY Daily and the Daily Press that allude to the benefits and disadvantages of health care reform in the local area. In addition, I will gather oral histories in the form of interviews from physicians at Olde Towne Medical Center and politicians in the Williamsburg City Council.

 

Updated Annotated Bibliography

**I’ve only added two more entried because I have not been able to find out who financed and supported the WISC complex. I am hoping special collections can help me with that. I still plan to lean pretty heavily on my interviewees.

Annotated Bibliography

 

Taylor, April. “Ball Games Boon To Tourism Industry.” The Daily Press 7 Aug. 2003. Web. 11 Feb. 2013. http://articles.dailypress.com/2003-08-07/news/0308070071_1_outback-steakhouse-williamsburg-families.

This article touches on the fiscal impact and tourism brought into Williamsburg during the Cal Ripken Jr. World Series. The world series played host to many families cheering on their ten year old sons/grandsons during the baseball games that took place in James City County. This gives me a great background of what Williamsburg served as for tourists. It also shows me that their was quite a buzz around town marking this as an important historical event. One of my teammates actually played in this and I will be interviewing him about it.

 

Watson, George. “Ripken World Series Starts In Williamsburg.”The Daily Press 2 Aug. 2003. Web. 11 Feb. 2013.http://articles.dailypress.com/2003-08-02/sports/0308020160_1_cal-ripken-world-series-ripken-ranks-billy-ripken.

In this article Watson talks about how the World Series was chosen to take place in Williamsburg. It was basically lobbied here by a little league representative. Ripken like the idea of having it here. Williamsburg youth baseball had never been associated with a more broad community and the World Series allowed it to join something bigger. It created a much more memorable experience for the youngsters. With this in mind I will focus on what the World Series meant to citizens of Williamsburg. How did it shape the community? Was there a big local following? Things of that nature.

 

Richards, Ed. “League To Host Cal Ripken World Series.” The Daily Press 19 Apr. 2003. Web. 11 Feb. 2013. http://articles.dailypress.com/2002-04-19/business/0204190226_1_babe-ruth-league-host-families-williamsburg-community.

This article by Ed Richards is announcing that the local little league has signed a contract to bring the World Series into town. The main focus of the article is the financial impact the tourism will create. Along with that they are anticipating it helping with the tourism in the long run hoping that people will see Williamsburg as a desireable destination. I have actually thought about getting in touch with the head of the little league to ask him some questions.

 

Tribe Athletics. “Former Soccer Coach Albert Honored By Coaching Association.” 23 Jan. 2013. Web. 11 Feb. 2013. http://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2012/former-soccer-coach-albert-honored-by-coaching-association.php

Tribe athletics published this article only a few weeks ago but it touches on the impact coach Al Albert had on the community. His Tidewater Soccer Camp brought in summer campers year in and year out ranging from all youth age groups. I hope to somehow get in contact with Mr. Albert and talk to him about the various camps he established.

 

Athletic Department Records, Special Collections Research Center, Swem Library, College of William and Mary.

In one of the collection boxes I found three separate newspaper clippings referring to the Tidewater soccer camp run by former Tribe Soccer coach Al Albert. In those articles he is quoted explaining the importance of soccer to the community and how the sport is growing in Williamsburg. One of the articles even touches on how many campers were attending and how the numbers jump higher and higher each year. These articles, like the other about the World Series, give me plenty of background information that will lead into quality questions. I hope to get in contact with Mr. Albert but our current coach John Daly ran the camps with Coach Albert. If I can’t get to the main source I will definitely go to our current coach.

 

***********************************************************************

 

What are they saying about WISC?. WISC, 2012. Web. 9 Mar. 2013. <http://www.thewisc.com/about/605824.html>.

 

Although this page does not seem like much it helps paint a picture of how the community views the WISC. The feedback is all positive therefore it is slightly biased however, the information provided is still a good starting place for me while I look for different avenues of the WISC to investigate.

 

 

About WISC. WISC, 2012. Web. 9 Mar. 2013. <http://www.thewisc.com/about/index_E.html>.

 

This page is the “about” section on the WISC website. It is very brief but there is something on it that I found to be very useful, the President of the WISC is quoted in here and he states why the WISC was created. The page also goes on to list the parameters for the buildings and fields. It is not much but it will definitely help me get started.

 

 

 

Oral Interviews:

 

JT Castner- Baseball

John Daly- Women’s Head Soccer Coach

Chris Haywood- President of WISC

Updated Bibliography

“About Us.” The Newberry Consort. Newberry Consort, 2013. Web. 27 Feb. 2013

Information on the ensemble at the Newberry Library in Chicago, which serves as a resident ensemble, but also tours.

 

Bullock, Helen. On Music in Colonial Williamsburg. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1938. Print.

Bullock provides research on the music that existed in Williamsburg during the historically colonial era (not the restoration). She discusses types of music and venues, and notes that there was no record of any concerts by professional musicians at the time. This source will be helpful in showing historical instances of music versus the reenactment by the Governor’s Musick Ensemble.

 

Colonial Williamsburg. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, copyright 2013. Web. 10 Feb. 2013. http://www.history.org

History.org is the official site for Colonial Williamsburg. It includes historical information, as well as blogs, resources in the area, and promotion of museums and local attractions. I tried to use this site to research information on the Governor’s Musick, but it was very difficult to find anything—they are not even mentioned on the page for the Governor’s Palace.

 

Colonial Williamsburg, Inc. The Governor’s Palace. Williamsburg, VA: Colonial Williamsburg, Inc., 1935. Print.

I have not had a chance to look at this book yet, but I am hoping that it will provide some background information on the Governor’s Palace as a venue in Colonial Williamsburg, and as an institution. This book’s age (published in 1935) might also be able to give some historical perspective on what the building was like around the time of the founding of the Governor’s Musick.

 

“Concerts.” National Gallery of Art. National Gallery of Art, copyright 2013. Web. 30 Jan. 2013. http://www.nga.gov/programs/music/

The National Gallery of Art seems to be one of the few exceptions to this. They have what they are calling the “National Gallery of Art Orchestra” and “National Gallery of Art Vocal Ensemble,” which would be groups that I am hoping to research to see in what ways they are alike or different from the Governor’s Musick.

 

“Folger Consort named Best Classical Chamber Ensemble for the fourth consecutive year at Washington Area Music Awards.” Folger Shakespeare Library. Folger Shakespeare Library, 2005. Web. 27 Feb. 2013.

Information on the early music ensemble at the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Folger Consort. It includes repertoire, musicians, schedules, and their Early Music Seminars.

 

Governor’s Music of Colonial Williamsburg. A Delightful Recreation: the Music of Thomas Jefferson. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1993. CD.

I have the audio files and liner notes for this CD. The notes focus on Jefferson’s interest in music and what he would have experienced at the time. It also credits the ensemble, and promotes it as having a distinct role in Colonial Williamsburg, providing a critical musical element to the historical environment of the restoration.

 

Hay, Brian. “Governor’s Musick Brings Colonial Music to Valley.” The Morning Call, 31 Oct. 1993. Web. 30 Jan. 2013. http://articles.mcall.com/1993-10-31/entertainment/2950417_1_colonial-williamsburg-governor-s-palace-stringed-instruments

This is an online article from Lehigh Valley paper in October of 1993, which discusses an upcoming concert in area. The article quotes Tom Marshall, former member of the ensemble, and includes a small amount of information on the historical accuracy of instruments, and what instruments women would have played in the Colonial era. Notably, this is one of the few informative pieces that appears when one googles “Governor’s Musick.”

 

Instrumental Music from the Colonial Williamsburg Collection. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1987. CD.

I have the audio and notes on this CD as well. It features four musicians on period instruments, but not the “Governor’s Musick Ensemble” by name. The notes include information on music in Colonial Williamsburg, instruments, and the performers.

 

Moon, John C. A Study of Common Music in the Early Colony of Virginia. Williamsburg: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, 1992.

Moon’s research is another look into historical music from the colonial era. He focuses on “common music,” which was not necessarily documented, as in folk tradition. He notes that his research has been undertaken in order to aid the foundation staff in their authentic portrayal of colonial music.

 

“Palace Concert.” Colonial Williamsburg. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, copyright 2013. Web. 30 Jan. 2013. http://www.colonialwilliamsburg.com/plan/calendar/palace-concert/

This is the page on the official website for visiting Colonial Williamsburg. It lists the concert dates and times for the Governor’s Musick ensemble. It only explains this group as CW’s “early music ensemble” and gives a one-sentence summary of their repertoire. This page also gives ticket prices for performances.

 

Possible Oral Histories:

Professor Tom Marshall

Lance Pedigo

James Darling

Bibliography Update

These are pretty much all of the same sources from my first bibliography, but I’ve added a little and changed the blurbs under some of them.

 

Special Collections

“The Legende.” Earl Gregg Swem Library Special Collections. Williamsburg, VA: Print.

The Legende is the name of Walsingham’s yearbook.  Swem currently has 13 copies from various years throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s in Special Collections. In looking at these and hopefully more recent ones that Walsingham has, I can see how the school has changed over the years. Because I was not in Williamsburg over break, I was not able to visit Special Collections. I’m planning on doing this very soon, though.

Previous WDP Project

McDonald, Maggie. “The Williamsburg Catholic Community: “There should be a book written about this place.”” Williamsburg Documentary Project, College of William and Mary, 2008.

This project discusses the founding of Walsingham Academy in its history of the Catholic community of Williamsburg. Maggie McDonald also conducted many oral histories for this project that will be helpful for my project.

Oral Histories

Carr, Monsignor William, Interviewed by Maggie McDonald, Williamsburg Documentary Project, The College of William and Mary, 24 April 2008, digital voice recording, Richmond, VA.

Eltz, Sr. Berenice, Interviewed by Maggie McDonald, Williamsburg Documentary Project, The College of William and Mary, 28 April 2008, digital voice recording, Williamsburg, VA.

Pitard, MaryEllen, Interviewed by Maggie McDonald, Williamsburg Documentary Project, The College of William and Mary, 10 April 2008, digital voice recording, Williamsburg, VA.

These interviews were conducted as part of Maggie McDonald’s 2008 WDP project. All three of these oral histories have parts where Walsingham is mentioned, and will be helpful in my research.

 

 

Potential Oral Histories to be Conducted

Sr. Rose Morris, a current theology teacher at Walsingham Academy.

Sr. Agnes Loretta, one of the founding members of Walsingham.

Scott Bolton, the current Vice Principal of Walsingham who also attended the school himself.

Websites

Walsingham Academy. Copyright 2010. Web. 7 Feb. 2013. http://www.walsingham.org/.

Walsingham’s official website has a lot of information about its history and its current state. I have gotten into contact with one of the sisters that runs the school through its online directory, and she seems like she’ll be very helpful in doing this project.

“Walsingham Academy.” Facebook. Facebook. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Walsingham-Academy/230300876983532

The Walsingham Facebook page has a ton of great information on it. There are pictures from recent events, new stories that Walsingham students/ parents might find interesting, and event pages for upcoming school performances and sports events. I can get a lot of great information from this page about the current state of the school. I continue to look at the Facebook page. It is kept up with very well and offers a lot of cool information.

Newspapers

Vaughn, Tyra M,. “Walsingham Academy Choir Will Perform for Pope.” Daily Press, December 9, 2010. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Walsingham-Academy/230300876983532

This is one example of a more current newspaper article I found talking about Walsingham’s choir’s visit to Rome in 2010. I hope to find more articles in the Daily Press about the school as I keep digging.

Virginia Gazette, Inc. Virginia Gazette. 1930-present, microfilm. Earl Gregg Swem Library.

I have not been able to start going through Swem’s microfilms of the Virginia Gazette, but I hope to find out more information about the history of the school through older articles I will hopefully find in the Virginia Gazette. I still haven’t gotten started on microfilms yet as I was not in Williamsburg over break. I need to also look at the topic binders at the Williamsburg public library, which may help the process of looking through the Gazette not be as overwhelming.

Books

Buetow, Harold A. The Catholic School: Its Roots, Identity, and Future. New York: Crossroad, 1988.

This book looks at the pros and cons of Catholic schooling academically, socially, theologically etc. It also looks at debates about the development of Catholic school curriculum. I’d love to discuss these topics with those I conduct oral histories with.

Grant, Mary A. and Thomas C. Hunt. Catholic School Education in the United States: Development and Current Concerns. New York: Garland Publishing, Inc., 1992.

This book is really interesting because it goes through the development of Catholic schooling in the United States from colonial times until now. I think this general history will provide great context for modern Catholic schools and Walsingham more specifically.

Youniss, James and John J. Convey, ed. Catholic Schools at the Crossroads: Survival and Transformation. New York: Teacher’s College Press, 2000.

This book is very interesting because it looks at the decline in numbers of Catholic schools and their students over the second half of the twentieth century. It asks why enrollment has declined, why parishes have stopped funding schools and why so many religious teachers have left the schools. I think it could be interesting to discuss these issues with those I conduct oral histories with.

Bibliography

Bibliography

 

CNN Wire Staff. (2010). 14 states sue to block health care law. CNN. Retrieved from, http://www.cnn.com/2010/CRIME/03/23/health.care.lawsuit/index.html.

 

This source provides me with the anti-Affordable Care Act (ACA) beliefs of many of the Southern states, including Virginia. It provides me with a state-wide context, which I can compare to Williamsburg’s local attitude towards health care reform.

 

Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF). (2012a). A Guide to the Supreme Court’s Affordable Care Act Decision. KFF: Focus on Health Reform. Retrieved from, http://www.kff.org/healthreform/upload/8332.pdf.

 

The Kaiser Family Foundation’s website is a goldmine of information about health care reform in general and the ACA, specifically. This document in particular is helpful because it discusses the implication of the June 2012 Supreme Court case on the ACA. I predict that when I ask people about their present-day attitudes towards the ACA, many of them will discuss the Supreme Court case. This KFF report will help me understand the context of their remarks as well as confirm or deny any assertions they may have regarding the implications of the Supreme Court decision.

 

KFF. (2012b). A Guide to the Supreme Court’s Decision on the ACA’s Medicaid Expansion. KFF: Focus on Health Reform. Retrieved from, http://www.kff.org/healthreform/upload/8347.pdf.

 

This document is similar to the one referenced above, but it focuses more particularly on Medicaid expansion.

 

(KFF) (2012c). Mapping the Effects of the ACA’s Health Insurance Coverage Expansions. KFF Health Reform Source. Retrieved from, http://healthreform.kff.org/coverage-expansion-map.aspx.

 

This resource provides me with the opportunity to see who will benefit from the ACA. According to the website, upwards of 23% of residents in the 23185 zip code will benefit from ACA coverage expansion. This data is probably not well known so it will be interesting to compare it to the perceived benefits of Williamsburg residents.

 

Washington, W. (2009). Poll: South isn’t buying Obama health plan. The State. Retrieved from, http://www.thestate.com/2009/11/11/1022511/poll-south-isnt-buying-obama-health.html#storylink=misearch.

 

Many of the documents we have read so far refer to Williamsburg as a “Southern town.” I am interested in comparing Williamsburg to the South in general. This South Carolinian newspaper article refers to a poll among Southerners (referenced below) that declares health care reform a less popular political initiative among Southerners. I am interested in seeing if Williamsburg residents agree with their southern counterparts.

 

Winthrop University. (2009). Winthrop Poll of 11 Southern States: Health Care Reform. The Winthrop Poll. Retrieved from, http://www.thestate.com/static/html/winthrop.htm.

 

See above annotation.

 

The White House (2012). Health Insurance Reform Reality Check. Whitehouse.gov. Retrieved from, http://www.whitehouse.gov/realitycheck/faq#i1.

 

This resource provides the federal perspective on health care reform. It comes from the White House so it is obviously pro-health care reform. This should provide me with the facts I use to cross-check with my interviewees’ interpretations of the law.

 

I also plan to use specific articles from the Virginia Gazette and the Daily Press that allude to the benefits and disadvantages of health care reform in the local area. In addition, I will gather oral histories in the form of interviews from physicians at Olde Towne Medical Center and politicians in the Williamsburg City Council.

Annotated Bibliography

Special Collections

“The Legende.” Earl Gregg Swem Library Special Collections. Williamsburg, VA: Print.

The Legende is the name of Walsingham’s yearbook.  Swem currently has 13 copies from various years throughout the 1950s, 60s, and 70s in Special Collections. In looking at these and hopefully more recent ones that Walsingham has, I can see how the school has changed over the years.

Previous WDP Project

McDonald, Maggie. “The Williamsburg Catholic Community: “There should be a book written about this place.”” Williamsburg Documentary Project, College of William and Mary, 2008.

This project discusses the founding of Walsingham Academy in its history of the Catholic community of Williamsburg. Maggie McDonald also conducted many oral histories for this project that will be helpful for my project.

Oral Histories

Carr, Monsignor William, Interviewed by Maggie McDonald, Williamsburg Documentary Project, The College of William and Mary, 24 April 2008, digital voice recording, Richmond, VA.

Eltz, Sr. Berenice, Interviewed by Maggie McDonald, Williamsburg Documentary Project, The College of William and Mary, 28 April 2008, digital voice recording, Williamsburg, VA.

Pitard, MaryEllen, Interviewed by Maggie McDonald, Williamsburg Documentary Project, The College of William and Mary, 10 April 2008, digital voice recording, Williamsburg, VA.

These interviews were conducted as part of Maggie McDonald’s 2008 WDP project. All three of these oral histories have parts where Walsingham is mentioned, and will be helpful in my research.

Websites

Walsingham Academy. Copyright 2010. Web. 7 Feb. 2013. http://www.walsingham.org/.

Walsingham’s official website has a lot of information about its history and its current state. I have gotten into contact with one of the sisters that runs the school through its online directory, and she seems like she’ll be very helpful in doing this project.

“Walsingham Academy.” Facebook. Facebook. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Walsingham-Academy/230300876983532

The Walsingham Facebook page has a ton of great information on it. There are pictures from recent events, new stories that Walsingham students/ parents might find interesting, and event pages for upcoming school performances and sports events. I can get a lot of great information from this page about the current state of the school.

Newspapers

Vaughn, Tyra M,. “Walsingham Academy Choir Will Perform for Pope.” Daily Press, December 9, 2010. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Walsingham-Academy/230300876983532

This is one example of a more current newspaper article I found talking about Walsingham’s choir’s visit to Rome in 2010. I hope to find more articles in the Daily Press about the school as I keep digging.

Virginia Gazette, Inc. Virginia Gazette. 1930-present, microfilm. Earl Gregg Swem Library.

I have not been able to start going through Swem’s microfilms of the Virginia Gazette, but I hope to find out more information about the history of the school through older articles I will hopefully find in the Virginia Gazette.

Books

Buetow, Harold A. The Catholic School: Its Roots, Identity, and Future. New York: Crossroad, 1988.

Grant, Mary A. and Thomas C. Hunt. Catholic School Education in the United States: Development and Current Concerns. New York: Garland Publishing, Inc., 1992.

Youniss, James and John J. Convey, ed. Catholic Schools at the Crossroads: Survival and Transformation. New York: Teacher’s College Press, 2000.

I have not been able to look at these books much since checking them out, but I hope they will provide a good context for my project because of their broader focus on Catholic schools throughout the United States.

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About

The Williamsburg Documentary Project (WDP) strives to collect and preserve the rich past of Williamsburg, Virginia. By conducting oral history interviews, building physical and digital archives, and creating online exhibits, the WDP interprets Williamsburg’s recent past. The WDP works towards developing a better understanding of Williamsburg by bringing together individuals, local groups, Colonial Williamsburg, and the College of William & Mary.

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